Tribute to SHOEMAKER'S apprentice who INVENTED ELECTRICMOTOR,A GALVANOMETER & The Nobel laureate stating GENETIC INHERITANCE!!
Posted December 3rd, 2013
View All Posts | View All Videos

 


William Sturgeon (22 May 1783 – 4 December, 1850) was an English physicist and inventor who made thefirst electromagnets, and invented the first practical English electric motor. Sturgeon was born in Whittington, near Carnforth, Lancashire, and apprenticed to a shoemaker. He joined the army in 1802 and taught himself mathematics and physics. In 1824 he became lecturer in science at the East India Company's Military Seminary at Addiscombe, Surrey, and in the following year he exhibited his first electromagnet.


 


The figure to the right is first artificial electromagnet, invented by Sturgeon in 1824. Sturgeon`s original drawing from his 1824 paper to the British Royal Society of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce. The magnet was made of 18 turns of bare copper wire (insulated wire had not yet been invented).


 


He displayed its power by lifting nine pounds with a seven-ounce piece of iron wrapped with wire through which a current from a single battery was sent. In 1825, Sturgeon invented the modern compass, by using the concept of electromagnetism. In 1828 he put into practice Ampere's idea of a solenoid.


 


In 1832 he was appointed to the lecturing staff of the Adelaide Gallery of Practical Science in London, where he first demonstrated the DC electric motor incorporating a commutator.


.


In 1836 Sturgeon established the journal Annals of Electricity, Magnetism and Chemistry, and in the same year he invented a galvanometer.


 


In 1840 he became superintendent of the Royal Victoria Gallery of Practical Science in Manchester. He formed a close social circle with John Davies, one of the Gallery's promoters, and Davies' student James Prescott Joule, a circle that eventually extended to include Edward William Binney and John LeighThe Gallery closed in 1842, and he earned a living by lecturing and demonstrating. He died in Prestwich in 1850.


 


 


 


Thomas Hunt Morgan (September 25, 1866 – December 4, 1945) was an American evolutionary biologist, geneticist and embryologist and science author who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1933 for discoveries elucidating the role the chromosome plays in heredity.


 


Morgan received his PhD from Johns Hopkins University in zoology in 1890 and researched embryology during his tenure at Bryn Mawr. Following the rediscovery of Mendelian inheritance in 1900, Morgan's research moved to the study of mutation in the fruit fly(Drosophila melanogaster). In his famous Fly Room at Columbia University, Morgan demonstrated that genes are carried on chromosomes and are the mechanical basis of heredity. These discoveries formed the basis of the modern science of genetics.


 


During his career, Morgan wrote 22 books and 370 scientific papers. As a result of his work, (Fruit fly)Drosophila became a major model organism in contemporary genetics. The Division of Biology which he established at the California Institute of Technology has produced seven Nobel Prize winners.



View All Posts | View All Videos
 
0

SOME INTERESTING POSTS!!!!!



How noble is NOBEL ????

Read More


This Amazing Painter invented a code because of late news of wife's demise; which was used throughout the globe as TELEGRAPH !!!

Read More


A Handyman's child, starting as film projectionist went on to create one of the Greatest Cartoon Characters of All Times!!!

Read More


Father of PHOTO & RAY !!!

Read More